Walt Disney, Pinocchio, and Lessons for Leaders

Walt Disney’s Pinocchio

One of the attributes that made Walt Disney unique amongst movie studio heads in Hollywood was that he was both a businessman and an artist. Walt worked everyday with the sensitivity of an artist and the hardheadedness of an entrepreneurial business owner, leading and directing his artistic and technical staff to create high-quality entertainment that would bring joy and happiness to ordinary people.

Long-time Disney animator and director Wilfred Jackson (1906-1988) provides insight into how Walt worked on his earliest feature-length films in a series of retrospective correspondence letters with author and musician Ross Care from the mid-1970s through the early-1980s that are newly published in the book Disney Legend Wilfred Jackson: A Life in Animation (Theme Park Press, 2016). Read more

I’m In Love With The Amazon Doctrine (or The Once and Future King)

Jeff Bezos, amazon CEO

I just learned about something called The Amazon Doctrine, which explains why I love amazon so much.

The company’s leaders and guiding minds are committed to treating customers right. They invest, learn, and continually adapt to win and keep customers. They help me acquire knowledge, entertainment, and other solutions-oriented products to make me a more productive and happier person. They are what they proclaim to be: the everything store. And they never seem to stop working to make my life better so that I will continue to buy from them. Read more

Author Barry Linetsky

Why You Should Never Utter “Internal Customer”

When customers collide

It has long been recognized that businesses survive when they create and deliver solutions at a profit that customers desire and will pay for by means of voluntary exchange. Business success is ultimately in the hands of consumers. In this sense, the customer is king. The choices made by customers decide which businesses will succeed and which will fail, and so much more in terms of the efficient allocation of resources in a free-market society.

Peter Drucker famously identified this notion as a broader business philosophy he referred to as The Marketing Concept.

Then along came the TQM gurus. Read more

Author Barry Linetsky

Disney History Blog Reviews The Business of Walt Disney

Didier Ghez’s Disney History blog

Didier Ghez, one of the foremost Disney researchers and prolific author of dozens of important books on Walt Disney Studio-related history, is first out of the blocks with a review of my recent book dealing with the business aspects of Walt Disney’s career. The review appeared today at Ghez’s Disney History blog,

The Disney History blog is a great resource for discovering the latest book releases and other miscellaneous items of interest to Disney history buffs. And Ghez’s Walt’s People series of books containing interview transcripts of people who worked with Walt and for the studio is an excellent and highly valuable resource for those with an infatuation for a behind the scenes look at the people and stories that populated Walt’s world. I love reading these interviews and hearing from the artists themselves as they reflect on their own careers and major studio events.

Here’s Didier Ghez’s review in its entirety, published on 20 June 2017. Read more

Walt Disney’s Secret to Making Dreams Come True: Courage

In doing research for a 1955 article for Woman’s Day magazine to correspond with the opening of Disneyland, writer Don Eddy spent time with Walt at the Disney studio and the park. He summed up Walt’s “special secret” to making dreams come true with “four C’s. They are Curiosity, Confidence, Courage, and Constancy.” Eddy wrote:

“From his insatiable curiosity, as persistent and all-embracing as a child’s, he gets his ideas. When he settles on one idea, his confidence take supreme command; nothing can shake it. His courage keeps it alive and active against all obstacles, and he has plenty of obstacles. And he is constant to it until it becomes reality. Then he drops it abruptly and rarely mentions it again.” Read more

Organizational Insights into Effective Strategy Development and Execution

I am a huge fan of the value and effectiveness of the research and writings of management science pioneer Elliott Jaques.

Jaques conducted organizational research for 50 years, culminating in an management system he called Requisite Organization. One of the most impactful management books in my education and practice is a book written by Jaques and Stephen Clement, Executive Leadership. Following closely behind two other late career books by Jaques, Requisite Organization and Social Power and the CEO. Read more

Allergan’s David Pyott on Responsible Leadership

In my last blog post I provided my comments on Bower and Paine’s observations in the May-June 2017 issue of HBR regarding two popular perspectives on the purpose of a business: shareholder-centric and company-centric.

In the same issue there is an interview with former Allergan CEO David Pyott.

I like David Pyott’s perspective with regards to the responsibility of executives qua managerial leaders, so I thought I’d share it. Read more

Author Barry Linetsky

Are Corporate Leaders Adhering To Their Corporate Purpose?

Is my company customer-centric?

The question of the underlying purpose of business and the role of corporate leadership has come up again in an excellent article by Joseph Bower and Lynn Paine, “The Error at the Heart of Corporate Leadership,” in the May-June 2017 issue of Harvard Business Review.

There are two general schools of thought about the purpose of a business, note Bower and Paine. Read more

Author’s Page for The Business of Walt Disney with Book Excerpts

Theme Park Press has posted the release and availability of The Business of Walt Disney on its site along with an author page, description of the book, and the Introduction. There are also two excerpts from TBWD, the first from Chapter 16, and the second from Success Principle 3.

Are Internal Customers More Important than External Customers?

If you have read my Ivey Business Review article When Customers Collide, you will know that I consider the very idea of internal customers to be harmful and imprudent.

But not everyone agrees, including very popular and successful businessmen like former BB&T CEO John Allison and excellence advocate Tom Peters. Read more